Confronting Fundamentalism Together | Catherine Wallace | TEDxUofIChicago

Irrational, judgmental, authoritarian, hard-Right Christian fundamentalism threatens democracy and the rule of law: Donald Trump is merely the culmination of their long and dangerous influence upon American politics. To oppose fundamentalism effectively, reasonable people must collaborate despite the diversity of our religious and philosophical commitments. We can more easily collaborate if believers and nonbelievers alike share a compelling story about moral values that we hold in common

Catherine M. Wallace PhD is a cultural historian and literary critic who teaches in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. Her most recent project is the seven-volume Confronting Fundamentalism series.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

#LanguageMatters | Aria Razfar | TEDxUofIChicago

Does language matter? Do all languages matter? In this engaging talk, Professor Aria Razfar, an educational linguist, recounts how throughout history, “non-standard” languages have been marginalized with consequences for the people who use them. To deny these languages is to deny the lives that speak them. Narrow views of language stifle individual and social creativity while fueling greater inequity. Through the linguistic ingenuity of a multilingual two year, he offers a compelling story for why all languages should matter in schools and society at large. A #funtartartalk!

Dr. Aria Razfar is Associate Professor of Language, Literacy & Culture at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research interests are grounded in sociocultural theories of language, learning, and human development. In particular, he draws on linguistic anthropological perspectives such as language socialization and language ideologies for the purposes of understanding learning and development in urban schools.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

Superpowers Are For Everyone | Victor Mateevitsi | TEDxUofIChicago

“Our comic book heroes aren’t the only superheroes in the world,” claims Victor Mateevitsi, Ph.D. Candidate in Computer Science with a background in Human Augmentics and Wearable Technologies. How can we add an extra sense, an extra capability? How can we extend our abilities to overcome our limitations, augment human experience and improve quality of life? In his latest research he presents SpiderSense, a wearable haptic jacket that allows the users to feel the environment around them on their own body. Through tiny vibration motors that gently vibrate on their skin, SpiderSense, solves real-life problems, impacting, among others, the very people who need it most — the visually impaired. Do you still think we can’t make the invisible, visible?

Victor Mateevitsi is a PhD candidate at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago, and the founder of SpiderSense, a tactile jacket that helps the blind navigate safely. He is focusing his research on exploring, designing and evaluating novel human augmentation techniques facilitated by technology. He is a Dean’s Scholar Award recipient, has been named one of the “20 in their 20s” by Crain’s Business Magazine and “Fifty for the Future®” by the Illinois Technology Foundation and his work has been featured on popular-press magazines such as Forbes, Popular Mechanics, New Scientist and on pop-culture television programs such as the “Daily Planet” and “All-American Makers”.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

I Am Undocumented | Ken Gonzales | TEDxUofIChicago

Ken uses art to explore his unique status as a gay, undocumented Asian living in America. In this talk, he performs an emotionally moving spoken word poetry piece.

Ken is a gay, undocumented Asian American of the 1.5 generation hailing from the islands of the Philippines. His interests lie in understanding the intersections of race, politics, and art as they pertain to identity, history, and activism. His work is influenced by the following quote: “If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

A Story of Numbers | Amy Ho | TEDxUofIChicago

Life is traditionally defined by numbers, from age to grades to salary to time. In this inspiring talk, 25-year-old emergency medicine physician Dr. Amy Ho discusses how numbers defined her life… until she started to define them.

Dr. Amy Faith Ho is a emergency physician and writer. She has had multiple national publications and features on medical humanities, health policy and mentoring in forums like NPR, Forbes, Chicago Tribune, KevinMD and others. Her speaking and media engagements include presentations with American Medical Association, American Academy of Emergency Medicine and television features in ABC’s The Today Show, Discovery Channel’s Untold Stories of the ER and TLC’s Sex Sent Me to the ER.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

Change of Heart: A Murder Victims’ Family Member Advocates Mercy | Jeanne Bishop | TEDxUofIChicago

What does public defender and murder victims’ family member Jeanne Bishop want more of in the criminal justice system? Mercy. In her talk, Bishop asks for more opportunities to show mercy to defendants in that system, from the bail that is set, to sentencing ranges for crimes, to clemency. Bishop brings her unique perspective as both the sister of a young woman who was shot to death along with her husband and unborn child, and a criminal defense attorney representing people accused of serious crimes.

Jeanne Bishop is the sister of Nancy Bishop Langert, who was murdered along with her husband and their unborn baby by a juvenile in 1990. Since the murders of her family members, Bishop has been a passionate advocate of gun violence prevention, abolition of the death penalty, forgiveness and the role of victims in the criminal justice system. She is the author of Change of Heart: Justice, Mercy and Making Peace with My Sister’s Killer (Westminster John Knox Press 2015), an attorney with the Office of the Cook County Public Defender and an adjunct professor at Northwestern University School of Law.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more athttp://ted.com/tedx

 

Dr. Aria Razfar

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Dr. Aria Razfar is Associate Professor of Language, Literacy & Culture at the University of Illinois at Chicago. His research interests are grounded in sociocultural theories of language, learning, and human development. In particular, he draws on linguistic anthropological perspectives such as language socialization and language ideologies for the purposes of understanding learning and development in urban schools. He teaches courses in the Bilingual/ESL program as well as doctoral courses in Language, Literacy, and Culture. Dr. Razfar’s work is anchored in communities whose language practices have been historically marginalized in many formal and official spaces of society; thus, there is an explicit social justice character to his research. He currently serves as a principal investigator or co-PI on several nationally funded grants aimed at improving teaching and learning for English Language Learners in urban contexts. He is director and principal investigator of English Learning through Math, Science, and Action Research (Project ELMSA), funded by the U.S. Department of Education.

Victor Mateevitsi

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Victor Mateevitsi is a PhD candidate at the Electronic Visualization Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago, and the founder of SpiderSense, a tactile jacket that helps the blind navigate safely. He is focusing his research on exploring, designing and evaluating novel human augmentation techniques facilitated by technology. He is a Dean’s Scholar Award recipient, has been named one of the “20 in their 20s” by Crain’s Business Magazine and “Fifty for the Future®” by the Illinois Technology Foundation and his work has been featured on popular-press magazines such as Forbes, Popular Mechanics, New Scientist and on pop-culture television programs such as the “Daily Planet” and “All-American Makers”.

Dr. Catherine Wallace

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Catherine M. Wallace PhD is a cultural historian and literary critic who studies the metaphors buried within contemporary moral debates. These metaphors have a history. They have a potent cultural backstory that invisibly shapes (and sometimes distorts) our
perceptions. Since the attacks of 9/11 she has studied Christian fundamentalism, tracing the origins of its rigid, implicitly violent, and peculiarly literal-minded misreading of Christian tradition. She has been interviewed in the New York Times, on the Today Show, Dateline, Voice of America, and NPR coast-to-coast. A former book-review editor and columnist for Anglican Theological Review, she served four years as Writer in Residence at Seabury, an Episcopal seminary. She currently serves as a lecturer in medical humanities and bioethics in the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University. The title of her talk is “Confronting Fundamentalism Together.”

 

Kenneth Gonzales

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Ken is a gay, undocumented Asian American of the 1.5 generation hailing from the islands of the Philippines. His interests lie in understanding the intersections of race, politics, and art as it pertains to identity, history, and activism. His interests in race relations stemmed primarily from primarily at the intersections of African American history and activism in the advancements and cultivation of Asian American activism. His work is influenced by the following quote: “If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”